Phase One Exhibition: Indiba Arts Space x Local Motif, Rwanda


 

A community impact movement


 



Currently showing at our Partner Gallery in Kigali, Rwanda, Phase One is a group exhibition featuring works of 5 Rwandan artists: Izabiriza Moses,Willy Karekezi, Kakizi Jemima, Iirumva Isaac and Eustache Usabimama, all employing an array of media and dynamic techniques in their artistic expressions.


Curated by Local Motif, a community impact movement, in conjunction with India Arts Space; understanding arts and culture create opportunities for political expression, community dialogue, shared cultural experiences, and civic work - they invite guests to experience Rwanda’s finest visual representations.



 

Dates: 23rd, October - 20th of November, 2021.


Location: Indiba Arts Space, Kigali, Rwanda.




Phase One Exhibition currently showing at Indiba Arts Space, Kigali, Rwanda
Phase One Exhibition, Rwanda - Image by Cedric for Indiba Arts Space





Some of the Featured Artists include:


Willy Karekezi


A self-taught conceptual artist who lives and works in Kigali, Rwanda, Willy Karekezi is the founder of Indiba arts space and co founder of the Local Motif. His work is driven by social and political engagement. With paintings, sculptures, installations and public art Willy expresses himself. He believes art is without boundaries, enabling him communicate his narrative to the society. Through educative programs and working within refugee camps in Rwanda and Uganda - he contributes financially and emotionally between workshops, exhibitions and installations.

Karekezi has worked with the Moleskine Foundation, American Refugee Committee, UNHCR, European Youth Exchange Project and Kinderfreunde Austria. Also exhibiting worldwide in solo and group shows - The National Museum of Uganda; The Oglethorpe University Museum of Art in Atlanta; Green Circle - pool7, Vienna; Sprachsalon Berlin; and the London School of Economics and Political Science.

In his words, "In my mission to create myself I try to develop in my mind an image of my truth according to an idea, which I believe to be universal. I'm inspired by everyday life which connects me to the wider world".



Akimanizanye Kakizi Jemima


A multidisciplinary artist whose works are an intersection of semi abstract and abstract. She derives interest in making art that addresses issue we go encounter in our daily lives (women in particular); changing the way we look at certain things.

Her art invites the audience to engage in discussions about subjects that are rarely talked about or are deemed as taboo, an approach which she believes is useful in engaging community consciousness and improving social conditions. Kakizi believes that her art plays a role in boosting the confidence of women and giving them a positive feeling.




Iirumva Isaac

A self-taught artist, illustrator and muralist based in Rwanda. Iirumva started drawing at an early age, influenced by creative mediums he perceived as repositories of a society’s collective memories.


As a contemporary artist, he defines his art as 21st century contemporary, influenced by global culture and technological advancement. His art is a dynamic combination of his perspectives and societal collectives; such as cultural dialogues, identities, characters and memories.



 





Media Coverage at Phase One Exhibition currently showing at Indiba Arts Space, Kigali, Rwanda
Image Courtesy: Cedric - for Indiba Arts Space




Local Motif:

Local Motif is a platform to encourage change and a movement where art transactions can impact growth and opportunities to empower young and emerging artists.


Indiba Arts Space:

Located in Kigali, Rwanda - owned by artist, Willy Karekazi. Indiba focuses on rich and diverse art in Rwanda including conversations beyond the art, hosting art residencies, creative talks and artist classes.




 




Forme Femine is building a digital network of pan-African artists, in addition to curating exhibitions around the themes of African female agency and artistic expression. Forme Femine’s mission is to erode the barriers limiting African artists’ visibility and to provide access to resources necessary for their success.